Frequently Asked Questions

Hey everyone! I get a lot of e-mails and have trouble keeping up with all of them so here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions.

Where should I photograph in Rocky Mountain National Park?

One of the best ways to find a host of great locations to photograph is via my website. I have the photos categorized by location so that you can see some of the photographic possibilities in each area. I also have photos categorized by season and also by month so if you know when you will be visiting you can see some of the places that I typically shoot at that time of year. Another great option is to purchase my eBook "Photographing Rocky Mountain  National Park". It covers most of the best places to photograph together with information as to when to be there and links to Google Maps showing you where to stand. Alternatively, here is a short list of a few of the most easily accessible and photogenic locations in Rocky. For sunrise: Sprague Lake, Moraine Park, Dream Lake, Lake Bierstadt, Chasm Lake. For Sunset: Bear Lake, Rock Cut, Ute Trail.

When is the best time of year to visit Rocky Mountain National Park?

All year long there are great possibilities for photography; however most people who ask this question are primarily interested in flowers or fall colors. The wildflowers really start to come out in the lower meadows during the first two weeks of June and then slowly make their way up into the higher elevations. The best wildflowers in the tundra can usually be found during the second and third week of July and many of the remote alpine lakes will peak around the first few days of August. One thing to keep in mind is that although we have beautiful wildflowers, they are rarely as prolific as you will find in some areas of southern Colorado. As for fall colors, they typically begin in the tundra during the first week of September and make their way down, hitting the aspen around Bear Lake by about the third week of September. They then continue slowly down to lower elevations finishing around Estes Park at about the second week of October. The months of the year when I find photography the hardest is in November and April when everything is brown. I typically take my trips out of state during these months. Regardless, if you are creative, you can find opportunities all year long. 

What type of gear do you use?

First, I don't believe that gear is the most important thing. In my mind, an alarm clock is almost more important than the camera. For me, which camera I use mostly comes down to how large I need to print. Photography is all about light and composition. You can take great photos with almost any camera that has some form of manual control if you understand these two things. With that said, I currently use the following equipment:

Cameras: 

  • Nikon D800e
  • Canon t3i

 

Lenses:

  • 24-70 F2.8 (Nikon)
  • 24-105mm F4 (Canon)
  • 14-24mm F4 (Nikon)
  • 70-200mm F4 (Canon)
  • 100-400 F4 (Canon) 
  • 24mm 1.4 (Canon)


Tripod: Feisol: CT-3471

Ballhead: Achratech GV2

Filters: Singh-Ray Graduated Neutral Density 0.9 soft

Software: Adobe Lightroom

How did you get started in photography?

This is not your normal story and so it is not necessarily the recommended route for entering the world of photography. I spent many years living in the Balkans and, upon moving back to the USA in January of 2004, I realized that I had the opportunity to do whatever I wanted. I thought about what I enjoy most in the world: hiking in the mountains enjoying beauty and solitude. I then spent some time thinking about how I could make a job out of it. After a bit of research I decided that I would become a professional nature photographer even though I knew very little about photography and was told very clearly that it was almost impossible to make a living this way. My stubbornness combined with my entrepreneurial blood to send me off in this direction. I began by spending hours studying the work of other photographers. I wasn't focused on the equipment they used but on which photos excited me and understanding why they did. I tried to understand how the lighting and composition contributed to creating emotions. At the same time I began to practice with a small point-and-shoot. I would solicit honest feedback from professional and advanced amateur photographers and then go back out to apply their advice. I worked very hard to incorporate all that I was learning and tried to be very critical of my work. Within 18 months of my decision to become a photographer I began selling my work at art shows. I then moved into selling in various galleries and within three years of that decision I opened my own gallery. During this time I used whatever equipment I could afford and, as I've seen a valid need, I've slowly upgraded. I still have a long way to go, but I'm continuing to learn. The biggest obstacle I see in other beginning photographers is that they don't like criticism whereas I welcome it as a window allowing me to see where I need to improve.

Do you give courses or teach workshops?

At present I do not do any teaching. The main reason for this is that most people want instruction during the busy summer and autumn months which is also when I do all of my photography and sales in the gallery. Life gets too busy during those four months and so I've had to cut back to stay healthy and have not renewed my guiding insurance or park guiding permits. What I do offer is an eBook called "Getting Started in Landscape Photography". It is exactly what I would teach you if you hired me for a workshop, but instead of costing $350 it is just $14.00! You also avoid the pain of putting up with me. :-)

If you do prefer a workshop to a book, I have two friends in the area that I highly recommend for photography instruction: Jared Gricoskie and James Frank. Both of these guys can help you take your photography to the next level and both know Rocky Mountain National Park very well. Book early because their services are very popular.

Can I go hiking with you?

The short answer is "no". The primary reason that I took up photography was to find a way to carve out more time in my life for solitude. I spend most of my week engaged with people and because of my personality I need time to be alone in order to be whole. In the solitude I am restored. It is the place where I can finally connect with what is happening deep inside of me. Times of silence can move us from living superficial lives to deeper and more meaningful lives. In solitude I can finally be quiet enough to begin to hear God's still quiet voice pulling me beyond myself. In solitude I am also at my most creative and can see things that I would otherwise have missed.

How can I improve my photography?

I suggest that you begin by not taking so many photos. Slow down and spend some time looking through your view finder before you push the shutter button. Make sure that you have just one clear subject and that you have chosen the optimal angle to photograph it. Look at the subject from a number of different angles before you take even a single photo. A tripod can help you slow down and think more carefully about how you compose an image. Secondly, pay attention to the light. I do most of my photography during the 15 minutes before and after sunrise and sunset when the light is warm, gentle and full of color. I rarely take my camera out during the rest of the day. Thirdly, after you have taken your photos spend some time analyzing each one carefully. Try to figure out what you like about each one and what would have made it better. Fourth, spend a great deal of time looking at good photography. Try to understand how the photographer composed the subject and what type of light they used. I spent many months doing this when I was learning to photograph. There is so much we can learn from simply spending time trying to understand the photos that move you emotionally. Finally, take the leap and begin sharing your photos on a nature photography forum such as:. You need to not only be open to helpful critiques but to actually seek them. Welcome criticism as it will enable you to grow and become the photographer you want to be.

Here are three very good books to help you get started: The first is my own book, "Getting Started in Landscape Photography". This book is exactly what you would hear from me if  you were to take one of my introductory workshops.  Another good book is, "Nature Photography Photo Workshop" by Nat Coalson walks you through just about every step of becoming a nature photographer. In "The Ultimate Guide to Digital Nature Photography"the authors provide a broad background to getting started in nature photography while wowing you with amazing images. All three of these books are great resources if you are serious about growing in this area.

What do you recommend for processing images?

I shoot all of my images in RAW format. If you are wondering why, simply do an online search for RAW vs. Jpeg and you will find many articles that explain the reasoning in great detail. To organize and process my images I use Adobe Lightroom. In my mind there is no better program out there. I highly recommend it and so do almost all of my friends who are professional photographers. A good book to help you get started or to take your Lightroom skills to the next level is Nat Coalson's "Lightroom 4: Streamlining your digital photography process." Nat is a good friend and has taught me almost everything I know about Lightroom. Check out his courses as well!

What advice do you have for someone wanting to become a professional nature photographer?

My first advice is to make sure you have a real job to provide an income. It is extremely difficult to make a living with landscape photography. There is a lot of it out there and the demand is limited. Making a living at nature photography can be done but realize that you don't make your income actually doing photography but in selling photography. Many of my friends who have normal jobs spend more time doing photography than I do since so much of my time is spent running the business. In my view the most important thing needed to become a professional nature photographer are business skills. Knowing how to market and run a business over the long-haul is in many ways more important than your photography skills. The next thing I would say is that you need to have something unique to market. You should have a unique niche that no one else in the world has. In my mind, this is the main key to building a business out of your photography. A good way to get started is to get your work out in front of potential customers and then listen to what they have to say. The art show circuits are a good way to get started and to begin to get customer feedback. The key is to listen and apply what you hear from them and to learn to identify their needs. This is true whether your focus is on print sales or stock photography. Listening and growing through feedback is essential.