Reports: Snowshoeing In RMNP

Winter begins as early as October in Rocky Mountain National Park and lasts until April. During these many months, most of my treks take place on snowshoe, often through some very adverse conditions. What you may see as just another pretty picture may represent many hours of hard work finding my way through deep snow. It is often a challenge but always refreshing to be out in the cold crisp air.
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Alone in Rocky

Dream Lake Area, Rocky Mountain National Park

A fresh snow had just fallen creating a world of beauty. I was the only one in this area of the park this morning and had the stillness to my self. This lone pine up near Dream Lake was also there, off by itself to enjoy the calm quiet of the fresh snow. Photo © copyright by Erik Stensland.

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March to Haiyaha

Near Lake Haiyaha, Rocky Mountain National Park

Deep snow on the trail to Lake Haiyaha makes snowshoeing difficult. Photo © copyright by Erik Stensland.

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Crack Through Plaid

Lake Haiyaha, Rocky Mountain National Park

This was taken on Lake Haiyaha on a day with harsh winds and blowing snow. To take this, I was lying on my stomach on the ice in the shade of a large boulder while the winds howled above me. The ice seemed to have a plaid pattern and this shot shows a distinctive crack running through it. Photo © copyright by Erik Stensland.

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Blizzard Journey

Lake Haiyaha Trail, Rocky Mountain National Park

This was taken after two feet of fresh snow had fallen. It was very difficult to even reach the parking lot at Bear Lake and then took us nearly 4 hours to reach this point near Lake Haiyaha. The winds were howling and the conditions were blizzard like. We set out hoping that the clouds would clear in time for sunrise, but it didn't happen. This photo shows what we go though in order to get images like the ones on this website. It isn't merely leaning out the car window and snapping an image, but often involves expending incredible effort for just one image. Thanks to Michael Hodges for letting me use this photo of him. Photo © copyright by Erik Stensland.

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